Posts Tagged ‘bars and clubs’

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Where to Wet Your Whistle in Cholula

Friday, May 20th, 2011

Bar Reforma’s decor includes silk flowers hanging from the ceiling.When it comes to nightlife, the Puebla capital has a reputation for being, well, a bit boring. This is largely because major concert acts and theater productions frequently pass it by for the more cosmopolitan and populous Mexico City nearby. But the greater Puebla area nonetheless offers an abundant supply of lively bars, dance clubs, and music venues where locals and tourists alike can get their drink, their groove, or their air guitar on.

On any given night of the week, it’s typical to head for one of four zones where clubs cluster: the Centro Histórico/Los Sapos, Avenida Juarez, La Isla by Angelópolis mall, and Cholula. We tend to hang out in Cholula, because it’s both close to home and unparalleled in its diversity of choices. Whatever we’re in the mood for — dinner with a bottle of wine, a game of pool over a few beers, live jazz or rock, dancing till dawn, etc. — we can find it on or just off the main drag that stretches from behind the UDLA to the zócalo of San Pedro. (Note: The street’s name changes from 14 Poniente to 14 Oriente at Avenida Cinco de Mayo and then Avenida Morelos near the pyramid.) In general, Cholula is also more affordable than the so-called fresa establishments in Puebla proper, where well-heeled poblanos often dominate the scene and drive up prices.

A bachelorette party livens up the show at Taxi Bar.We try not to get too attached to any particular place, because even Cholula’s most popular spots seem to change names, motifs, and owners as often as the university welcomes a new freshman class. The students do, after all, provide a significant chunk of their customer base, so catering to fickle sensibilities can attract steady business, at least for a while. That said, we tend to roll with a slightly older crowd (25 and up) and our list of faves below, which currently lacks a dance club, reflects this. All but one of our picks has been around for at least two years.

A few tips for visitors: Although it’s safe enough for single women to go out on their own, if you do you’re unlikely to be left alone, particularly if you look foreign; savvy national gals travel in pairs, if not packs, when unescorted by someone of the opposite sex. Smokers should be aware that it’s illegal to light up indoors, or outside of designated smoking areas, although management at some places may look the other way if no one complains. Cash is always the preferred method of payment and often the only one accepted; carry small bills and pay in exact amounts to avoid long waits for your change. A 10 percent gratuity is appreciated.

Our Favorite Local Watering Holes

Bar Reforma (4 Sur at Avenida Morelos) From the outside, this small cantina connected to a hotel almost looks like a scene from Desperado: Patrons push through swinging saloon doors on a corner of the town’s main drag to enter. Once inside, however, they’re greeted not by gun-slinging outlaws, but by dueling walls of photographs — a collage of Cholula’s 126 churches on the left, a sea of Marilyn Monroe glamour shots on the right. You can ponder whether this is some kind of metaphor for saints and sinners over a glass of the house’s signature sangria. For those who drink a few too many, management has kindly installed talavera basins in both restrooms specifically for vomiting. Open after 5 p.m., every day but Sunday.

La Búrbula (14 Oriente #422, next to Monchis) We have a soft spot in our hearts for this restaurant-meets-lounge because it’s where we went on our first date in 2007. The building’s been remodeled since then, but the tasty menu — mostly appetizers, salads, pizzas, and pastas — and the Polynesia-goes-disco atmosphere remain the same. La Búrbula entices the thirsty with frou-frou cocktails like mango daiquiris and margaritas, but also pours the usual fare (beer, wine, liquor, etc.). It sometimes features DJs and bands in the evenings. Open daily from 2 p.m. on. Update: La Búrbula has moved to 5 de Mayo #407 in the heart of San Pedro Cholula.

Cus Cus Cus (6 Norte #601, between 6 and 8 Oriente) Only a few blocks from the pyramid off Avenida Morelos, Cus Cus Cus occupies a historic home that’s been converted into a shabby-chic restaurant and lounge. Each room is a bit different, beckoning patrons to choose between cozy side rooms or the airier central courtyard. We go for the variety of cocktails — it’s one of the few places that offers drinkable wine by the glass — and snacks, particularly the popcorn chicken and the pizzas, which are piled high with toppings. Open Thursday to Saturday after 7 p.m.

El Salvaje Oeste (Carril a Morillotla #301, a half dozen speed bumps or so from the Carretera Federal a Atlixco.) This neighborhood bar is way off the beaten path, but for those who want to visit an authentic cantina, it’s our favorite. Run by the same family that owns the taco stand, cobbler, and mini mart on the same block, The Wild West has been serving cold beer and tequila since the residential area around it began developing more than 15 years ago. It started as a hole-in-wall with a few bar stools and sawdust-covered floor and has since expanded into a full-fledged dive, replete with vinyl sofas and a big-screen TV. Open most evenings except Sundays.

Jazzatlán (2 Sur #102 at Avenida Morelos) This artsy café and bar hosts live music at least two nights a week. The last time we went there, we not only caught a fantastic local jazz trio, but also took advantage of a sweet dinner special: buy any bottle of wine, get a pizza and salad for free. It’s conveniently located, too, just around the corner from San Pedro’s main square, where there’s a taxi stand and a public parking lot. Cover charge ranges from free to 150 pesos, depending on act booked. Doors open at 8 p.m. Tuesday through Saturday.

RokPub (14 Oriente #616 at 8 Norte) This rock & roll burger joint is part sports bar, part night club, depending on which day of the week you happen to pop in. There’s one crowded pool table downstairs and several more upstairs, where patrons can also play Nintendo Wii — lots of giggles for anyone who’s able to handle a little public humiliation. RokPub also offers live music, happy hour specials, and shows major sporting events on the big-screen. Open daily, 11 a.m. to 3 a.m., except Sunday, 2 p.m. to midnight.

Taxi Bar (12 Oriente at 2 Norte) Located inside Container City, Taxi draws hipsters of all ages with cold beer, funky décor, and DJs/live bands. Expect a loud and festive environment: The bar’s open-air design means that sometimes its music mixes with that of the sustainable strip mall’s other occupants. Although it doesn’t serve food, patrons can often order tacos or döner kebab without leaving their seats, as waiters from adjacent restaurants wander through the crowd. Open most days from early afternoon on.

Is your favorite bar or club missing from the list? Share your top Cholula night spots with us in the comments section below! Find an error? We did our best to verify each bar’s current business hours, which of course are subject to change. If you have updated infomation, please contact us.

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Drinking in Local History at La Pasita in Puebla

Sunday, March 20th, 2011

La Pasita sells its hand-crafted liqueurs by the glass or the bottle.La Pasita is the oldest cantina in Puebla—and, although it specializes in Mexican liquors, you won’t find the usual shots of tequila or mezcal on the menu. Instead, barkeeps pour locally made libations, such as the house’s namesake pasita, a sweet raisin liqueur that’s served with a cube of salty aged cheese and a shriveled grape on a toothpick in the glass. Other flavors include lime, pineapple, coconut, anise, almond, eggnog, and the more exotic blackberry with jamaica flower and quince with apricot. Each caballito goes for 25 pesos (about $2).

Pasita liqueur is served in a shot glass with a cube of cheese and a raisin.La Pasita opened in 1916 as a small grocery called El Gallo de Oro in the downtown area still known as Barrio de los Sapos. It was purchased 44 years later by Emilio Contreras Aycan, who sought to preserve its hand-crafted liquors. In 1960, Contreras converted the establishment into liquor store and bar, and a year later, trademarked its signature raisin-based liqueur, la pasita. Today, all of its liqueurs continue to be distilled in the same way they were at the beginning of the 20th century. The business is now run by his son, Emilio, who plans to pass La Pasita and its traditions on to future generations, starMedia’s Vive México says.

Over the years, the popular hole in the wall has been visited by artists, students, political figures, and tourists from all over Mexico and the world. More than 20 different drinks are available, divided into three categories (beginner, intermediate, and professional) based on the level of alcohol they contain. Patrons can work their way up the chain from the somewhat harmless la monjita (little nun) to the rather ominous sounding sangre de brujas (witches’ blood). As these names and the bar’s signage and retro-cool decor suggest, the owners have a wicked sense of humor.

Legend has it that La Pasita became famous for serving drinks according to the number of blocks that a patron could walk without falling down after consuming them.

The basic bar menu at La Pasita. Shots of all flavors go for 20 pesos each.According to local news site Poblanerias.com, the bar’s regulars know their limits and often order their drinks that way: “a block and a half,” “five blocks,” etc. Vive México adds that anyone who can handle 20 shots a chance to pummel an effigy of former Mexican president Carlos Salinas. Anyone who does 100 shots without passing out drinks for free, wins 100,000 pesos plus the cost of their funeral. Only one person has ever done so; the runner-up, at 98 shots, was hospitalized (and had to pay his bar bill).

Since then, the Los Sapos plaza directly in front of La Pasita has evolved into a popular antiques bazaar by day and a nightclub area by night. The Puebla City Council has reportedly considered the possibility of closing the bar—which now has a second location—but due to the site’s history and value as a tourist destination, it decided to leave it be. Let’s all drink to that. ¡Salud!

The original La Pasita, located at 5 Oriente #602 at the corner of Callejón de los Sapos, usually opens from 12:30 to 5:30 p.m. weekdays. Its second bar, a block from the Cathedral at 3 Sur #504, serves drinks from 2 to 9 p.m. weekdays. (Both are in the city’s historic center.)

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