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Holiday Lights and Family Fun in Atlixco

Holiday lights in the main square of Atlixco.My first Christmas in Puebla, I had the pleasure of meeting my future husband’s entire extended family. My Spanish was far from perfect, and at times I felt a bit overwhelmed by the sheer enormousness of it all. No matter which group of kin we were visiting, the gathering always involved at least two dozen people, as well as food, drink, and hustle-bustle of epic proportions.

On Dec. 24, we gathered at his maternal grandmother’s house to share a late dinner — Basque-style salt cod, Poblano chiles stuffed with cheese, refried beans — and exchange “white elephant” gifts. With everyone crowded around the table, talking over one another and the festive background music, it was tough for me to follow (or contribute to) the conversations. So, I endeared myself to everyone by defying most gringo stereotypes and gleefully devouring several jalapeños too spicy for my other half. Charming, right?

As I sipped on a glass of cider during a reprieve, one of his cousins presented me with a beautifully wrapped box. For me? How thoughtful, thank you. We’d only just met. I proceeded to open it, with my beloved and his dad at my sides, as the chatter around me reached a new crescendo. Imagine my surprise to find a pair of red lace panties inside. I blushed, confused and embarrassed, and quickly put the lid back on the box. Only later did I come to find out that it’s customary to wear red underwear on New Year’s Eve in Mexico, for good luck, particularly in love. It works, too: Four years later, Pablo and I are married.

La Villa Iluminada

Holiday figures (three wise men) in the main square of Atlixco.The importance of family — not just mine, but everyone’s — in Mexican culture is evident around the holidays. People typically gather for traditional posadas in the days before Christmas and then continue the festivities through New Year’s Eve and Epiphany, which here is known as Día de Reyes. We kicked off our celebrations last year on Saturday with a dinner for 40 at La Aldea Hotel & Spa in nearby Atlixco, about 30 minutes by car from the Puebla capital. It was a spirited, all-night affair that included joke-telling, an indie rock concert by a trio of cousins, and an impromptu caravan into the city to see La Villa Iluminada (The City of Lights).

La Villa Iluminada is a 1.5-kilometer pedestrian route decorated with holiday lights that winds through the streets of downtown, from the main square to Insurgentes Boulevard, a major thoroughfare to the east. Millions colorful LEDs illuminate historic buildings, lampposts, and temporary fixtures. “For 45 days, the streets will form a circuit of light and color dressed up with figures, Christmas scenes, traditions, and the city’s identity,” officials said in 2011 on the city’s website.

The 2012 Villa Iluminada happens nightly, starting at 7 p.m., through Jan. 7, 2013.

We started our trek in the main square, where everything from city hall to the Italian Coffee shop is decked out in lights. After posing for photos with the three wise men and the giant Christmas tree, we strolled under a canopy of lights, listening to accordion music and savoring the smell of tejocotes, boiling away in freshly made ponche, that permeated the air. Street vendors offered all sorts of wares, from holiday handicrafts to flowers and pine trees. We passed through Atlixco’s oldest archway to reach the boulevard, where folk dancers performed on an elevated stage. The entire street, including the old train depot, glowed with multicolored flowers, stars, angels, and even avocados and pots of mole. It’s quite a sight — and well worth a visit.

A street vendor sells ponche (hot fruit punch) in Atlixco.Holiday lights decorate the oldest archway in Atlixco.Angels herald the holidays in the streets of Atlixco.Holiday lights in the streets of Atlixco.







The city of Atlixco reportedly invested more than 7 million pesos (US $550,000) in the expansive display, which is expected to attract 200,000 visitors during its run. Special attractions include carnival rides, various concerts through Dec. 23 and fiestas de reyes on Jan. 4, 5 and 6. For more information (in Spanish), click here. —Rebecca Smith Hurd

To get to Atlixco by car from the Puebla capital, take Vía Atlixcáyotl (head south/west from the Periférico) until it turns into a toll highway (438D). When the highway ends in a split, veer left onto the Puebla-Matamoros Highway. Turn right onto E. Zapata, which ultimately turns into Insurgentes, where you’ll run into the festival. For those traveling by bus, Linea Oro offers service to Atlixco from the CAPU station.

Post updated on December 14, 2012

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2 Responses to “Holiday Lights and Family Fun in Atlixco”

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  1. Giovanni Magana says:

    Hello Rebecca,
    I just want to thank you for writing such a wonderful report about how beautiful Atlixco is. I have been here twice. My wife and her daughter (who I raised from the age of 4, so I should say my daughter) were born here. I probably love this town as much as you do! I was gonna go back in 2010, but I lost my job.
    I really hope you have tried the cemitas poblanas. Here in the States, they are a little difficult to find. Too bad I can’t afford to travel now, otherwise we might run into each other in Atlixco! The only gringos I have come across are Mormon; they have beautiful churches built in Atlixco, Metepec, and the city of Puebla.
    Sincerely,
    Giovanni Magana

    p.s. Please keep writing on your website, which I visit every now and then.

  2. Rebecca says:

    Hello, Gionvanni! Thank you for the kind words and for commenting on the post. I adore cemitas — and pretty much all of the street/market foods in Puebla. I’d love to run into you someday in Atlixco if you get a chance to visit again. Wishing you all the best in 2012. ~Rebecca

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